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Bhf Animal Research Paper

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British Heart Foundation

British Heart Foundation

The British Heart Foundation (or BHF ) is a charity organisation in the United Kingdom that funds research, education, care and awareness campaigns aimed to prevent heart diseases in humans .

Foundation

The British Heart foundation was founded in 1961 by a group of medical professionals. who were concerned about the increasing death rate from cardiovascular disease. They wanted to fund extra research into the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of heart and circulatory disease.

It is a major funder and authority in cardiovascular research, education and care, and relies predominantly on voluntary donations to meet its aims. In order to increase income and maximise the impact of its work, it also works with other organisations to combat premature death and disability from cardiovascular disease.

Activities

British Heart Foundation Cymru demonstrating CPR skills.

The British Heart Foundation focuses on five areas of cardiovascular health:

  • Research - BHF will continue to pioneer research into the causes of heart disease and improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment.
  • Information - BHF will provide vital information to help people reduce their own heart health risk.
  • Campaigning - BHF will get government to establish policies that minimise the risk of developing heart and circulatory disease
  • Care - BHF will help attain the highest possible standards of care and support for patients.
  • Equality - BHF will reduce inequalities in the levels of heart disease across the UK

In 2013 The British Heart Foundation had an income of just over £133m. In 2013 the BHF spent their income on Research (61%), care and prevention (20%).

BHF invested a £90.7 million in research during the year. They also invested £29.1m in Prevention and Care work including healthcare professionals, putting defibrillators in public places and producing heart health resources for all age groups. BHF also awarded money to six new projects under the Hearty Lives initiative. They also continued their Heart Information Series which teaches people how to save peoples lives.

Case studies of how BHF work has helped individuals can be found in their here [1]. This includes examples of their research work and local volunteering activity.

Sponsorship

The British Heart Foundation sponsored two television series produced by Twofour. Kitchen Detective and Kid's Fit Squad. Both series encouraged healthy eating and exercise with practical advice for families, and aired on the Discovery Health channel. The BHF, along with Cancer Research UK. is a major backer of the anti-tobacco campaign group Action on Smoking and Health. [ 1 ]

Facts and figures
  • There are over 950 BHF Healthcare Professionals caring for patients across the UK.
  • Over 3,500 Heartstart UK schemes to educate people what to do in various emergency situations (not just cardiac emergencies). More than 3.2 million people have been trained by Heartstart UK in schools (for example via the Saving Londoners' Lives project) and the community.
  • In 2013, the British Heart Foundation had a gross income of over £133m. [ 2 ]
  • Every year 1 in every 145 babies are born in the UK with a congenital heart defect .
  • The 'heartbeat' logo was designed in 1971 by Sheila Harrison, one of BHF's regional organisers at the time. It's still very much in use today and is now one of the most recognisable logos in the UK. [ 3 ]
Fundraising

The BHF is mainly funded by legacies and wills. accounting for 40% of their income, the rest is made up of other voluntary income (31%), profit from the retail division (23%) and investment income (5%)

The charity organises a sponsored skipping challenge through schools, in which the participating schools are entitled to retain 20% of the money raised. [ 4 ]

Other annual campaigns include National Heart Month (held throughout February), Wear Red Day and The Big Donation as well as many other campaigns to recruit volunteers. raise awareness of BHF, sell stock and increase donations .

British duo Knock Twice released their debut single "I Heart You"[2] in aid of the British Heart Foundation on 8 February 2010.

In December 2010 Victoria Wood performed a show called "The Angina Monologues" for The British Heart Foundation with the strapline "Beating Heart Disease one laugh at a time". [ 5 ]

Retail Division

Other articles

Sucess of the British Heart Foundation Cpr Advert

Sucess of the British Heart Foundation Cpr Advert.

Success of the British Heart Foundation CPR
advertisement including Vinnie Jones

To: CEO of Prestigious Promotions
From: Harry Anderson
Terms of Reference: Within this report I will look at success of the BHF campaign looking at the variety of media they used and how successful each form of media was.
Procedure: I will do this by looking at evidence gathered from the internet, look at the facts and figures of the campaign and come to an overall conclusion on the success of the campaign.

The British Heart Foundation is the UK’s number one heart charity, founded in 1961. The charity was founded by a group of scientists concerned with the rising death rates from cardio vascular disease. The money raised from its 700 shops nationwide and donations go directly to scientists for research and development in cardio vascular diseases. Last year over £84 million pounds was given to scientists for research.
A few of the promotional mix were used to achieve their goals and help them achieve a successful campaign. Firstly advertising was used in various ways for the campaign the advert launched on twitter and was a success with 53,000 shares within the first week. The advert was also launched on YouTube before it debuted. Furthermore the advert has over 4 million views on YouTube. To create Publicity for the campaign they used a celebrity in Vinnie Jones this creates excitement about the advert a draws people into watching it: creating publicity. Finally from the advert there corporate image was increased over an already very good reputation. This was due to the advert actually saving lives.
The marketing mix was considered when the advert was made, here are some examples of the ones they used. The price of production of the advert was only £4000 I feel this was a great price for the production of a television advert as many companies would spend millions however.

British Heart Foundation

WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

The British Heart Foundation (BHF ) is a charity organisation in the United Kingdom that funds research into improving treatment, diagnosis and prevention of cardiovascular disease. [1] The BHF also funds education, care and awareness campaigns towards preventing some forms of cardiovascular disease. [1]

Contents Foundation [ edit ]

The British Heart Foundation was founded in 1961 by a group of medical professionals. who were concerned about the increasing death rate from cardiovascular disease. They wanted to fund extra research into the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of heart and circulatory disease.

It is a major funder and authority in cardiovascular research, education and care, and relies predominantly on voluntary donations to meet its aims. In order to increase income and maximise the impact of its work, it also works with other organisations to combat premature death and disability from cardiovascular disease.

Activities [ edit ]

British Heart Foundation Cymru demonstrating CPR skills.

A British Heart Foundation furniture and electricals shop, Gloucester.

British Heart Foundation shop, King Street, Hammersmith

The British Heart Foundation focuses on five areas of cardiovascular health:

  • Research – BHF will continue to pioneer research into the causes of heart disease and improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment.
  • Information – BHF will provide information to help people reduce their own heart health risk.
  • Campaigning – BHF will get government to establish policies that minimise the risk of developing heart and circulatory disease
  • Care
  • Equality – BHF will reduce inequalities in the levels of heart disease across the UK

In 2013 The British Heart Foundation had an income of just over £133m. In 2013 the BHF spent their income on Research (61%), care and prevention (20%).

BHF invested a £90.7 million in research during the year. They also invested £29.1m in Prevention and Care work including healthcare professionals, putting defibrillators in public places and producing heart health resources for all age groups. BHF also awarded money to six new projects under the Hearty Lives initiative. They also continued their Heart Information Series which teaches people how to save peoples lives.

Case studies of how BHF work has helped individuals can be found in their here [1]. This includes examples of their research work and local volunteering activity.

Sponsorship [ edit ]

The British Heart Foundation sponsored two television series produced by Twofour. Kitchen Detective and Kid's Fit Squad. Both series encouraged healthy eating and exercise with practical advice for families, and aired on the Discovery Health channel. The BHF, along with Cancer Research UK. is a major backer of the anti-tobacco campaign group Action on Smoking and Health. [2]

Facts and figures [ edit ]
  • There are over 950 BHF Healthcare Professionals caring for patients across the UK.
  • Over 3,800 Heartstart UK schemes to educate people what to do in various emergency situations (not just cardiac emergencies). More than 3.5 million people have been trained by Heartstart UK in schools (for example via the Saving Londoners' Lives project) and the community. [3]
  • In 2013, the British Heart Foundation had a gross income of over £133m. [4]
  • Every year 1 in every 145 babies are born in the UK with a congenital heart defect .
  • The 'heartbeat' logo was designed in 1971 by Sheila Harrison, one of BHF's regional organisers at the time. It's still very much in use today and is now one of the most recognisable logos in the UK. [5]
Fundraising [ edit ]

The BHF is mainly funded by legacies and wills. accounting for 40% of their income, the rest is made up of other voluntary income (31%), profit from the retail division (23%) and investment income (5%)

The charity organises a sponsored skipping challenge through schools, in which the participating schools are entitled to retain 20% of the money raised. [6]

Other annual campaigns include National Heart Month (held throughout February), Wear Red Day and The Big Donation as well as many other campaigns to recruit volunteers. raise awareness of BHF, sell stock and increase donations .

British duo Knock Twice released their debut single "I Heart You" in aid of the British Heart Foundation on 8 February 2010.

In December 2010 Victoria Wood performed a show called "The Angina Monologues" for The British Heart Foundation with the strapline "Beating Heart Disease one laugh at a time". [7]

Retail Division [ edit ]

According research cambridge university

According research cambridge university British Heart Foundation - Pioneering Research at Cambridge University

Thanks to the generosity of our supporters, we fund pioneering research across the UK. Find out about the life-saving research.

Fighting cancer: Animal research at Cambridge

Animal research plays an essential role in our understanding of health and disease and in the development of modern medicine and surgical techniques.

A world of learning & research inspired by Cambridge - Cambridge University Press India

We exist to unlock people's potential with the best learning & research solutions.

The future of energy?

Today, we consume a truly vast amount of energy - with demand continuing to skyrocket at an alarming rate. We know that producing this energy has significant.

About Cambridge University Press

How Cambridge University Press works to unlock people's potential with the best learning and research solutions.

Professor Peter Jones, University of Cambridge - What's new in mental health research?

Professor Peter Jones, University of Cambridge - What's new in mental health research?

Dr John Coates, Senior Research Fellow, University of Cambridge

Dr John Coates, Senior Research Fellow, Neuroscience and Finance, University of Cambridge and former Wall Street Trader discusses the study of hormone.

Roger Barker, Brain Repair Centre, University of Cambridge on a recent research paper

Dec 2012: Researchers in Italy and the UK have developed a new system for turning human embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into a.

Cambridge Ideas - The Boat Race: A Perfect Crew?

Striving for, and achieving, high performance in teams has become a major business imperative. Drawing on two years of ethnographic research with the.

Physoc - Access Policies - Wiley Online Library

The Physiological Society statement on access

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Free access is provided to all content one year after publication. Institutions in designated developing countries are granted immediate free access to both journals through Research4Life and INASP (see 'Developing World Access '). In addition, all the back issues of The Journal of Physiology from volume 1 (1878) have been scanned through the generosity of the Wellcome Trust and are freely available electronically on PubMed Central and HighWire.

The Physiological Society has funded a similar digitisation programme for Experimental Physiology and all back issues of Experimental Physiology. formerly the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Physiology. are freely available electronically on HighWire.

Publication of research results is expensive. In the US, many journals impose submission and page charges. While funding bodies in the US allow for such publication costs in their grants, this is not common practice in the UK. The Society journals do not, therefore, charge authors for normal (non open access) submissions, the costs of publication being largely funded from subscriptions.

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Your institution/funder may have an account or agreement with Wiley for payment of OA fees - Click here to find out.
The fee is US$3000 for The Journal of Physiology and $2250 for Experimental Physiology .

Information for NIH-funded researchers

From 2008, the NIH is mandating grant-holders to post their published papers in PubMed Central within 12 months of publication. The NIH mandate applies to all articles based on research that has been wholly or partially funded by the NIH and that are accepted for publication on or after 7 April 2008.

The Journal of Physiology is published on PubMed Central, with a twelve month embargo on public access – the final published version is publicly available 12 months after publication. No further action is needed by the authors.

For papers accepted for publication in Experimental Physiology. in order to help authors comply with the NIH mandate, Wiley-Blackwell will post the accepted manuscript (incorporating all amendments made during peer review, but prior to the publisher's copy-editing and typesetting) of articles by NIH grant-holders to PubMed Central at the point of acceptance by the journal. This version will then be made publicly available in PubMed Central 12 months after publication. Following the deposit Wiley-Blackwell authors will receive further communications from the NIH with respect to the submission. For further information, see the Wiley-Blackwell Open Access Options .

If authors wish to make their final published article immediately openly accessible, they can pay to publish using Wiley-Blackwell’s OnlineOpen service. The fee is US$3000 for The Journal of Physiology and $2250 for Experimental Physiology .

NIH-funded authors do not infringe copyright by publishing in The Journal of Physiology and Experimental Physiology .

Information for Wellcome Trust-funded researchers

The Wellcome Trust requires electronic copies of any research papers that have been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, and are supported in whole or in part by Wellcome Trust funding, to be deposited into PubMed Central (or UK PubMed Central). This requirement applies from 1 October 2006 to all grants, regardless of award date. The Trust will provide Grant Holders with additional funding to cover the costs of open access publishing so that they can post their articles on PubMed Central immediately on publication. This funding will be provided for articles reporting research that was part-funded by Wellcome.

  • Wellcome Trust position statement in support of open and unrestricted access to published research.

Authors funded by the Wellcome Trust who wish to publish in The Journal of Physiology or Experimental Physiology should apply to the Trust (openaccess@wellcome.ac.uk ) or their research institution for funds to pay the OnlineOpen fee (US$3000 for The Journal of Physiology and $2250 for Experimental Physiology ) to make their papers free to all readers as soon as they are published. The OnlineOpen Order Form can be found on the Publisher's website but you are not required to fill this in before the manuscript has been accepted. Wellcome Trust-funded authors will be directed to sign a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY ) licence post acceptance.

Information for British Heart Foundation-funded researchers

As a Condition of Grant the BHF requires that a copy of the final version of each peer-reviewed research paper accepted for publication, supported in whole or in part by BHF funding, shall be deposited in UKPMC, to be made freely available within 6 months of publication. If extra publication costs are required for open access in UKPMC, BHF will reimburse valid fees, or a proportion in the case of multiple funders, on full papers acknowledging BHF with the grant number. The University should pay the open access charge in the first instance and then submit a claim stating the BHF grant number to BHF with a copy of the journal’s open access invoice and a copy of the published paper.

Authors funded by The British Heart Foundation who wish to publish in The Journal of Physiology or Experimental Physiology should apply to the Foundation (research@bhf.org.uk ) or their research institution for funds to pay the OnlineOpen fee (US$3000 for The Journal of Physiology and $2250 for Experimental Physiology ) to make their papers free to all readers as soon as they are published. The OnlineOpen Order Form can be found on the Publisher's website .

Information for Research Council UK (RCUK)-funded researchers

From the 1 April 2013, all researchers that are in receipt of funding from RCUK will be required to comply with their policy on open access (OA) and accessibility to underlying research materials. RCUK-funded authors may wish to watch this three minute YouTube video that outlines the process. The policy states that to be compliant journals must offer a “pay to publish” (gold OA) option. When an article publication charge is paid the policies also mandate the use of the Creative Commons Attribution license (CC-BY ). This policy applies to the publication of peer-reviewed research articles and conference proceedings that acknowledge funding from the UK’s Research Councils. All papers must include details of the funding that supported the research and, if applicable, a statement on whether and how the underlying research materials – such as data, samples or models – can be accessed. In order to help the implementation of the policy, the Research Councils are introducing from April 2013 a new funding mechanism - a block grant to universities and eligible research organisations to cover the cost of article processing charges (APCs).

Authors funded by RCUK who wish to publish in The Journal of Physiology or Experimental Physiology should, upon acceptance, pay the OnlineOpen fee (US$3000 for The Journal of Physiology and $2250 for Experimental Physiology ) to make their papers free to all readers as soon as they are published. The OnlineOpen Order Form can be found on the Publisher's website but you are not required to fill this in before the manuscript has been accepted. RCUK-funded authors will be directed to sign a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY ) licence post acceptance.

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Overlooking the Importance of Animal Research

Overlooking the Importance of Animal Research

There has been a great deal of hot air exhaled by animal rights activists in the UK over the past week who think that animal research carried out within universities is unnecessary.

A Freedom of Information ruling found partly in favour of the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (BUAV) in its attempt to gain details of Home Office licenses that allow experiments on primates at Newcastle University.

Last week at Leeds University, another anti-vivisection group, Animal Aid, protested against experiments on dogs co-funded by the charity the British Heart Foundation. Animal Aid claimed that since 1988 over 100 dogs had died in experiments that were "medically irrelevant". Andrew Tyler, director of Animal Aid, said the experiments were 'unproductive and cruel' and called on people to withhold donations to the charity.

Thankfully, Betty McBride, Policy and Communications Director at the British Heart Foundation (BHF), stood her ground. Mcbride countered that such research had "contributed to incredible medical advances over the decades" and that the BHF "funded this work because it will save countless lives in the future".

That really is the trump card. In a week in which minor animal rights protests and tribunal rulings took the headlines, what has been missing in the coverage of these two events is the essential role that animal research continues to play in medical advances and life enhancing procedures.

For David Pruce,Chief Executive of Understanding Animal Research the importance of the use of animals in research cannot be denied, "Animal research is never undertaken lightly, but animals are essential in scientific research, in medicine development and safety testing. Many life saving developments that have had clear clinical benefit originated from research carried out at UK universities."

For example, deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease has transformed the lives of an estimated 40,000 patients. Monkey research led by neurologists at Oxford University identified a potential target for DBS: a structure in the brain known as the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Continuous stimulation delivered by a wire inserted into the STN and driven by a battery stimulator implanted under the collarbone blocks the abnormal nerve signals that cause tremor and other Parkinsonian symptoms.

The development of monoclonal antibody therapies were dependent on mouse research at Cambridge University from the 1960s onwards. This has resulted in Herceptin to treat breast cancer, rituximab for lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis, and many other targeted antibody treatments.

A new treatment for muscular dystrophy, an inherited degenerative muscle wasting disease, is now in clinical trials. This disease is caused by mutations in a very large gene, so attempts at 'conventional' gene therapy have been unsuccessful. The new type of gene treatment based on mouse studies has been developed by a collaboration of university researchers, many working in London.

Three UK groups of researchers in London, Oxford and Edinburgh have collaborated to develop a gene therapy to treat cystic fibrosis (CF) which is currently being trialled in humans. This has been developed over 20 years since the creation of the first genetically modified mice to carry CF gene defects. These mice showed that gene therapy was possible and the challenge has been to develop a safe and effective way to deliver a replacement gene which has involved tests in both mice and sheep.

Currently, academic research with Zebrafish is leading to better understanding of how the heart can repair itself. Zebrafish can repair their own hearts, so scientists are trying to unlock their secrets to learn how we can repair ours too. Several stem cell therapies for heart disease, based on mouse stem cell research in UK and European universities, are also in clinical trials.

Animal Research, inside and outside of academia, has clearly played an essential role in medical advances. This fact is persistently overlooked in the emotive and overblown claims,and reports from groups such as the BUAV and Animal Aid.

This is a disservice to the researchers who have advanced science, and the humans who have benefited and will benefit from their work

Scientists develop new technique that could improve heart attack prediction

Research Scientists develop new technique that could improve heart attack prediction

Our results show, for the first time, that certain areas of atherosclerosis within the coronary arteries, previously thought to be inert, are actually highly active and have the potential to cause heart attack. Once identified, they might be targeted with drug therapy more effectively.

Dr James Rudd, HEFCE Senior Lecturer at the Department of Medicine

Building on work pioneered in Cambridge 10 years ago. scientists have developed a new imaging approach that could help improve how doctors predict a patient’s risk of having a heart attack.

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) funded project, a collaboration between scientists from the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh, is the first to demonstrate the potential of combined PET and CT imaging to highlight the disease processes causing heart attacks directly within the coronary arteries.

The research, published last week in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), involved imaging over 100 people with a CT calcium scan to measure the amount of calcified or hardened plaques in their coronary arteries. This is a standard test, which is commonly used to predict heart attack risk but cannot distinguish calcium that has been there for some time from calcium that is actively building up.

The patients were also injected with two contrast agents that show up on PET imaging scans, and which can be used to track various metabolic pathways in the body. One of these tracers, 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF), is a molecule taken up by cells in which active calcification is occurring. The 18F-NaF can then be visualised and quantified during a PET scan.

The researchers wanted to see if they could identify patients with active, ongoing calcification because these patients may be at higher risk of heart attack than patients in whom the calcium developed a long time ago. The results showed that increased 18F-NaF activity could be observed in specific coronary artery plaques in patients who had many other high-risk markers of cardiovascular disease.

Dr James Rudd, HEFCE Senior Lecturer at the Department of Medicine and joint senior author of the paper, said: “Our results show, for the first time, that certain areas of atherosclerosis within the coronary arteries, previously thought to be inert, are actually highly active and have the potential to cause heart attack. Once identified, they might be targeted with drug therapy more effectively.

“Additionally, we might be able to improve our ability to predict an individual person's future risk of heart attack using this fairly straightforward imaging test in selected people.

“This research exploits longstanding scientific links between my research team in Cambridge and Professor Newby's in Edinburgh, with core support from the Cambridge NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, HEFCE and the British Heart Foundation.”

Dr Marc Dweck, lead author on the research paper and a BHF Clinical Research Fellow at the University of Edinburgh, said:

“Predicting heart attacks is very difficult and the methods we’ve got now are good but not perfect. Our new technique holds a lot of promise as a means of improving heart attack prediction although further ongoing work is needed before it becomes routine clinical practice.

“If we can identify patients at high risk of a heart attack earlier, we can then use intensive drug treatments, and perhaps procedures such as stents, to reduce the chances of them having a heart attack.”

Dr Shannon Amoils, Research Advisor at the (BHF), which funded the study, said:

“For decades cardiologists have been looking for ways to detect the high-risk plaques found in coronary arteries that could rupture to cause a heart attack, but it’s been difficult to develop a suitable imaging test that can focus in on these small vessels.

“This research is a technical tour de force as it allows us to assess active calcification happening right in the problem area – inside the wall of the coronary arteries and this active calcification may correlate with a higher risk of a heart attack.”

There are nearly 2.7 million people living with coronary heart disease (CHD) in the UK and it kills 88,000 people each year. Most of these deaths are caused by a heart attack. Each year there are around 124,000 heart attacks in the UK.

Animal Aid response to the British Heart Foundation

2. The BHF has provided a £1,165,872 Programme Grant renewal to Professor Dino A. Giussani – who heads the research programme of which the experiment was part. This is indicated on the BHF’s record of research grant awards given between 1 April 2011 – 31 March 2012: http://www.bhf.org.uk/pdf/BHF%20Grant%20Awards%202011-12-V3.pdf

3. The BHF acknowledges its financial support for the laboratory in which the experiment was carried out: http://www.express.co.uk/news/health/453370/Charity-blasted-for-repugnant-animal-research

In addition to its financial support for this study, the BHF has directly funded at least one other animal study that involves Professor Dino A. Giussani.[i] This is, like the sheep experiment, concerned with foetal injury caused by lack of oxygen. The paper contains the words ‘This study was funded by the British Heart Foundation and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) .’

[i] Vitamin C Prevents Intrauterine Programming of in Vivo Cardiovascular Dysfunction in the Rat, Circulation Journal- Official Journal of the Japanese Circulation Society, 2013

EXPOSING AND CHALLENGING CHARITY FUNDED VIVISECTION GET IN TOUCH