Alistair Macleod No Great Mischief Essay - Essay for you

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Alistair Macleod No Great Mischief Essay

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Alistair MacLeod (Author of No Great Mischief)

Alistair MacLeod

When MacLeod was ten his family moved to a farm in Dunvegan, Inverness County on Nova Scotia's Cape Breton Island. After completing high school, MacLeod attended teacher's college in Truro and then taught school. He studied at St. Francis Xavier UniversityMore When MacLeod was ten his family moved to a farm in Dunvegan, Inverness County on Nova Scotia's Cape Breton Island. After completing high school, MacLeod attended teacher's college in Truro and then taught school. He studied at St. Francis Xavier University between 1957 and 1960 and graduated with a BA and B.Ed. He then went on to receive his MA in 1961 from the University of New Brunswick and his PhD in 1968 from the University of Notre Dame. A specialist in British literature of the nineteenth century, MacLeod taught English for three years at Indiana University before accepting a post in 1969 at the University of Windsor as professor of English and creative writing. During the summer, his family resided in Cape Breton, where he spent part of his time "writing in a cliff-top cabin looking west towards Prince Edward Island."
-Wikipedia Less

Alistair MacLeod’s Books

Avg rating: 4.06 9,794 ratings 768 reviews

  • No Great Mischief

Published 1999 24 Editions

  • Island: The Complete Stories

    Published 1989 25 Editions

  • The Lost Salt Gift of Blood

    Published 1976 15 Editions

  • As Birds Bring Forth the Sun and Other Stories

    Published 1986 6 Editions

  • To Every Thing There Is a Season: A Cape Breton Christmas Story

    Published 2004 6 Editions

    Author Details

    Born in North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada on July 20, 1936. Died on April 20, 2014.

    Gender Male Genre Fiction

    Quotes

    All of us are better when we're loved.

    No one has ever said that life is to be easy. Only that it is to be lived.

    And then there came into my heart a very great love for my father and I thought it was very much braver to spend a life doing what you really do not want rather than selfishly following forever your own dreams and inclinations.

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    FREE No Great Mischief Essay

    Topics in this paper Popular Topics

    In No Great Mischief, Alistair MacLeod proves to the reader that it is impossible to talk about the Scottish-Canadian heritage without mentioning tradition, family and loyalty. MacLeod wrote this book about loyalty to family tradition. It is common to talk about these three things when one describes his family or his past in general, but in this book, MacLeod has included every single intricate detail about each one of the three aspects.

    Family plays the biggest role in this novel. Anything that the characters say or do usually has to do with family. The first time Alexander MacDonald, the narrator of the story, mentions family it is not his own. It is one of the immigrant families picking berries along the road that he is driving on (MacLeod 1). This point takes him directly into a slight mention of his own family: the grandmother (3). Since there is no main character in the book, it is thought to be the narrator. However, I wish to disagree with this fact and say that the real main character in this book is Alexander's brother, Calum, who lives in Toronto. The first time Calum is introduced, one of the first things to come out of his mouth is of family: "I have been thinking the last few days of Calum Ruadh,  (11). We find out that Alexander has a close relationship with his brother and he drives to Toronto to visit him every weekend. This has become almost a tradition because he does not visit him to actually have a constructive conversation or to resolve a problem, although Calum has many of them, the most serious of which is drinking, but instead he visits him only for the sake of visiting him. It is also a tradition in that they do the same thing every time: they drink, not so much Alexander as Calum. We later find out that Alexander has a similar tradition set up with other family members. The most distinct of which is his relationship with his grandmother: Grandma. When he visits Grandma, it is always the same routine: t

    Essays Related to No Great Mischief

    Canadian History, Nostalgia - Overview of Alistar Macleod s No Great Mischief

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    Overview of Alistar Macleod's No Great Mischief

    Alistar Macleod’s “No Great Mischief” is a novel full of constant recollections of the Clann Calum Ruadh’s past and genealogy and relating it to the history of Canada; everything that happened in the family’s past effected the life they live currently. This is evident in the characters Alexander McDonald, his brother Calum, the different groups of people and all the connections they have with their family’s past and connections they have with the Clann Calum Ruadh. Alexander is the main character and is the one explaining the story of the past in a very short time period in the present and he connects the family lines throughout history. Calum, the older brother, was left to take care of himself and his siblings at a young age, which results in his drunkenness at the present. Included in the story, at many different time periods, are various groups of people, such as the French Canadians, the English, and the Migrant workers who make an impact on the characters of the story. The reoccurring phrase “Always look after your own blood” (14) was passed down the family line and is questi.


    . middle of paper.


    . count of General Wolfe’s abuse of the Scottish Highlanders in Quebec (108)”. (134)
    Overall, I agree with the arguments she presents in her article and find some of them correspond very well with the conclusion I had written about.

    Sugars, Cynthia. "Repetition with a Difference: The Paradox of Origins in Alistair MacLeod’s No Great Mischief.” Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne [Online], (2008), Web. 20 Nov. 2013

    MacLeod, Alistair. No Great Mischief. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1999.
    Print.


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    No Great Mischief - College Essays - 2162 Words

    No Great Mischief

    eaNo Great Mischief by Alistair MacLeod – Topics and Themes Identify and give the significance of terms. Identify and elaborate on the significance (i.e. connection to plot development, characterization, symbols, motifs, patterns, contrasts, literary devices, etc). Make specific reference to the novel. *”All of us are better when we’re loved.” * chess set * Christy * Calum Ruadh house * James MacDonald * “No great mischief if they fall…” Margaret Laurence’s “lost languages” *Catriona * the wrench Calum Ruadh’s Point * family dogs * parents * Scotland * plaid shirt * gille beag ruadh * crippled pigeon * Colin

    * Peru * Renco Development * Lucy Gray * joke picture * the wallet * kitten (Piseag) * Grandma * Grandpa * Vietnam * blackfish
    * Grandfather * Catriona “’My hope is constant in thee, Clan Donald.” * Fern Picard * Marcel Gingras * San Francisco Alexander MacDonald Chapter 1 – introduction to the narrator (Alexander MacLeod and his brother, Calum); love of Cape Breton but not ever going back, Cape Breton Island shot glass (10) Chapter 2 – gille beag ruadh (“the little red boy” or “the little red-haired boy”), history of Calum Ruadh (the red-haired Calum who came from Scotland in 1779 with his family), and reference to the original Calum at rest: “Fois do t’anam. Peace to his Soul” (27) Chapter 3 – family knowledge, connections

    Chapter 4 – twins raised by grandparents, story of grandfather’s father dying (32), grandfather’s careful habits --“He has always been loyal to his blood.” (35), “the chance” (p. 37), Grandpa’s maintenance job (37-38) Chapter 5 – memories of paternal grandparents, Grandpa’s joke picture (43) Chapter 6 – twins go to live with the grandparents, death of parents and Colin, “Lucy Gray” poem (class memory, reminders of death of the parents, past imagery) p. 50 Chapter 7 – the wake/visitation for Colin at home of grandparents, grandfather’s violin playing (54), melting ice -“as if eaten by a hidden cancer which only now began to make itself visible” (55), family’s dog: “It was in those dogs to care too much and to try too hard.” (56-57), Colin’s parka (57 & other earlier references) Chapter 8 – changing realities e.g. names and maps of places; “Living in the past is not living up to our potential.” (60) Chapter 9 – return of the brothers to the old Calum Ruadh house (61), “It is hard when looking at the pasts of other people to understand the fine points of their lives” (62), “’Rearing the Modern Child,’ and …the subheadings was entitled ‘Grandparents’” (67), “He says you’re not my grandfather, only his,” said the sobbing red-haired Alexander MacDonald” (68). Chapter 10 – migrant workers, different opportunities for different people; ‘It doesn’t make much difference.’ Pick your own.” (71) Chapter 11 – teenaged years of the twins and changes e.g. “Only the hardest promontories of pure stone seemed to remain constant, but if one looked closely one could see changes in them also. A new smoothness born of a new wearing, or small pockmarks on new surfaces where previously there were none. The cliff was moving inland while Calum Ruadh’s grave seemed to be moving out towards its edge.” (73-74), “lamp of the poor” (75), brothers’ lifestyle e.g. embarrassment at questions (75), Christy (dependence upon her assistance + Romantic/pastoral images of her) p. 76-81, Calum’s infected tooth (79-81) Chapter 12 – descriptions of his work as a dentist or dental surgeon, information pamphlets (compare/contrast to Calum’s experience or that of the family altogether) e.g. “Sometimes, as healing advances, small sharp splinters may work up through the tissue and be a source of discomfort and unexpected pain” (83), crippled pigeon Chapter 13 – brothers growing older with some problematic behavior e.g. stopped by the police in their cars (84), talk of Scottish history e.g. At tax time, Grandpa says to Grandfather: “’My hope is constant in thee, Clan Donald,’ which is what Robert the Bruce was.

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    No Great Mischief

    The essays are ideal for those taking examinations in English Literature.

    No Great Mischief

    Sample essay topic, essay writing: No Great Mischief - 1790 words

    In No Great Mischief, Alistair MacLeod proves to the reader that it is impossible to talk about the Scottish-Canadian heritage without mentioning tradition, family and loyalty. MacLeod wrote this book about loyalty to family tradition. It is common to talk about these three things when one describes his family or his past in general, but in this book, MacLeod has included every single intricate detail about each one of the three aspects. Family plays the biggest role in this novel. Anything that the characters say or do usually has to do with family.

    The first time Alexander MacDonald, the narrator of the story, mentions family it is not his own. It is one of the immigrant families picking berries along the road that he is driving on (MacLeod 1). This point takes him directly into a slight mention of his own family: the grandmother (3). Since there is no main character in the book, it is thought to be the narrator. However, I wish to disagree with this fact and say that the real main character in this book is Alexander's brother, Calum, who lives in Toronto

    The first time Calum is introduced, one of the first things to come out of his mouth is of family: "I have been thinking the last few days of Calum Ruadh," (11). We find out that Alexander has a close relationship with his brother and he drives to Toronto to visit him every weekend. This has become almost a tradition because he does not visit him to actually have a constructive conversation or to resolve a problem, although Calum has many of them, the most serious of which is drinking, but instead he visits him only for the sake of visiting him. It is also a tradition in that they do the same thing every time: they drink, not so much Alexander as Calum. We later find out that Alexander has a similar tradition set up with other family members. The most distinct of which is his relationship with his grandmother: Grandma.

    When he visits Grandma, it is always the same routine: they sing long Gaelic songs, like the ones that their ancestors would. Alexander, for most of the first half of the book, does not talk about his present day family as much as his ancestors. He provides the reader with the information about how he wound up in Canada and what his ancestors had to go through to get here. Throughout this part of the book, Alexander makes it seem as if his family is more of an organization then a nuclear family of today, partly because of the things they do, partly because their relationships with each other, and partly because of their ultimate goal: survival. MacLeod gives us a blatant example of MacDonald's family having this quality when he describes them walking across the ice (48-50). MacLeod shows us that they are a model with everyone perfectly aware of their roles: the elder siblings looking after their younger ones, with the parents as the chief supervisors of the whole operation.

    It seems that the goal of the ancestors is constantly there with the family. It is obvious that this goal is not fully brought to modern times but there are still traits of it in Alexander's current lifestyle. However, we see that the roles have been reversed with time. Now, the youngsters, Alexander and Catherine are at the head of the family. They are the more successful ones and in the brothers' case, it is obviously Alexander taking care of Calum, not vice versa as before. They are more successful in that they were able to break away from the mining trade that their family has adopted in the past.

    They did this partly because of the fact that they simply did not want to work in the mines but also because they were the only family members to realize that it is not 1497 anymore and that it is time to move forward. However, the other four brothers are quite happy with what they have and do not mind the excessive physical labour that they undergo. They even seem to be happy to stay true to their roots. I think that Alexander has realized that in order to stay true to your origins you do not necessarily have to do exactly what your ancestors did. Alexander knows his family just as much as Colin or any of the other three brothers who are still out on the East Coast. However, we later learn that Alexander did not move away to become a dentist only to escape the dirty work that he would be required to do in the mines.

    The incident I am talking about happens right after Alexander graduates from medical school. He is having a graduation party at his grandfather's house, when the phone rings and we learn that one of the people from the mine has died. When the miners come back with the body of Alexander MacDonald, Alexander's cousin who he remembers from childhood, the phone rings again and we learn that Calum has to provide the same number of men as he had. Alexander volunteers to take up the empty spot (130-131). This proves to us that Alexander values his family so much and is so loyal to them that he is even willing to throw away the twelve years that he spent in medical school just to help his family out.

    He truly believes that family, and any group for that matter, is more important than the individual is. I would imagine that the family would make great Communist party members. He has worked so hard to get somewhere and he is willing to discard everything just because of this incident. I am sure that although he only needed to work for under a year, because they found another person to take his place, that he would have stayed there until they found a person, whether it be in 2, 5, or even 10 years. The idea of family as an organization is being is confirmed several times throughout the beginning of the book. For example, Alexander did not know his own name until he went to school for the first.

    He did not know his name not because his parents and other relatives had been hiding it from him but only because he did not need to know it: all he knew is that he was gille beag Ruadh, the red-haired boy, and that he was of the clann Chalum Ruaidh (18). Bigger boys began to make fun of him at recess and another older boy, the leader of the group, saved him from them because he was of the clann Chalum Ruaidh, because he was in, because he was one amongst many. No one cares who you are, what matters is what family you are from. Another verification was the part where a few random men walk up to Alexander and his cousin and hand them a 50$ bill just because they are of the clann Chalum Ruaidh (30). This is also another proof of the group, and therefore the group's benefit, to be more important than any individual's opinion or right. There are two very important things, a character and an incident, that summarize the attitude of the family towards loyalty in the book.

    The first, the character, is Christy, Calum's horse, who he loves to death would pick her life over his own. Surprisingly, MacLeod does not spend as much time with animals in this novel as one would think that he would. The part with Christy summarizes the whole book, in respect to loyalty, on page 11: "Ah, poor Christy! How she always kept her part of the bargain." This is implying that in every small relationship between man and man or even man and animal there is a certain bargain that is agreed to without words. It creates a bond between the parties and makes them treat everything that they have to do with each other more carefully and secretively, in a good way. There are many of such tacit consents in this book: "My brother looked at me and I, in turn, looked at the faces of my grandparents and at the parents of the red-haired Alexander MacDonald. I nodded my head slightly." (130) Most of the traditions in this book are described very briefly but come up numerous times throughout the book.

    The ancestors had their traditional song, dance & story telling in their time. That has survived until today. The modern family of Alexander MacDonald know the lyrics to the songs and the stories that they will, probably, in turn, to their kids. However, those traditions are becoming more and more scarce. Calum and especially Alexander are afraid to lose their heritage. They do not want to forget what their grandfathers and grandmothers have taught them.

    Alexander, almost every week, drives to his Grandmother's house to sing songs in Gaelic. Calum is asking Alexander to come visit him every weekend, without exception. Alexander, by making these visits, is creating a tradition himself. I believe that that is more then half of the reason that he keeps on doing this. I doubt that he actually wants to see his brother in the terrible state that he is almost always in and that he really, truly wants to sing Gaelic songs with his grandmother.

    This entire family really adores finding something that they really like and sticking with it right up to their death. For example, the way that grandfather dies is probably one of the best ways to go: he was relaxed, not in pain, and he was doing what he loved most: reading his history textbooks. In the latter part of the book, whenever there is any mention of grandfather anywhere he is always either reading a book or sleeping (228, 264). Everyone in the family is always content, no matter what kind of trouble they go through or how much they have enjoyed; they have always had enough to satisfy them. Towards the end of the novel, the reader is more and more convinced that the MacDonalds have serious problems. Regardless of how attached you are to your past it is way too much to still live on the same piece of land that someone from your family, your ancestor, has lived on in 1497.

    The MacDonalds live there not because they cannot afford something better but because they truly cherish the land that their ancestors cultivated and took care of. At the very end of the book, when Calum wishes for Alexander to take him back out to the East Coast to die there, it seems to be almost apologetic and gives the reader the impression that the brothers have to keep reminding themselves of their heritage.

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    5 June 2014. Author: Criticism